Wednesday, August 31, 2011

One More Reason to Teach in London, England: They Got Style Baby



Westfield Stratford is opening on September 13, 2011 as Europe's largest shopping centre, located in East London.  Instead of a boring ad to talk about how great their mall is going to be, they've made the incredibly cool video above. Great marketing, and showing a love for East London.  I wouldn't normally celebrate the opening of an Edmonton-style mall, but I must say, London knows how to do it best.
Anchored by John Lewis, Waitrose and Marks & Spencer, Westfield Stratford City will be home to over 300 dynamic brands, over 50 places to dine, a 17-screen, all-digital Vue cinema, the UK's largest casino operated by Aspers, three hotels, a 14-lane All Star Lanes bowling alley and events and entertainment spaces.






Canadian teachers are starting to pack their suitcases for jobs in London, England and I find myself answering this question more often these days "What should I pack for teaching & living in London?"  And my answer is always the same: not much.  You will shop in Europe. You will buy all new clothes and shoes and accessories.  You can try not to.  You might say you're not a big shopper, but one thing will happen. You'll live in London.  And then...well, they just have such style!  

Resources for Teaching in London

Classroom Canada website
Guide to Teaching in London: A Survival Guide for Canadians ebook
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Canadians & Americans in the UK blog

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Monday, August 29, 2011

Happy New YEAR! Or...Happy Last Night of Summer



I've always found New Year's celebrations to be the most bizarre time of year.  January 1st represents a new beginning, a time to make resolutions, reflect on your year & set goals for your new year.  But nothing really changes.  It's January - a new tax year sure, but that's about it.

For me, the New Year is always the new academic year.  That's the real "new year" afterall.  Teachers & students have spent 6-8 weeks on holidays and are gearing up for a brand new school year.  Teachers are trying to enjoy their last few moments of summer holiday, all while feeling somewhat guilty (or perhaps not at all!) about how little work they've gotten done this summer, even though they promised themselves that this summer would be the one where they plan their entire year ahead of time. 

Teachers in the UK start back tomorrow. Tonight, they are thinking through what they're going to do on the very first day of their new classrooms.  They might have their class lists already, and if they know some of the students then they're probably planning strategies for setting the tone of the year in those first few moments.

New teachers are freaking out, too nervous and excited to sleep. What will this year be like?

New Year's doesn't have this effect at all.  January 1st is really just another day. But September - that's a fresh start.

So to all the teachers starting school tomorrow, I wish you a very heartfelt Happy New Year! 

This is YOUR year. 

You're going to rock it!

Set your intentions, take deep breaths, let it all slide off your back, stay focused, flexible and fun. 

Remember to do what makes you happy, because good teachers speak from experience & lead through example. 

Take time in your evenings to exercise, read, socialize.

Have fun. 

This is the year that you're not going to raise your voice, not even once. You got this. 

You can get those students eating out of the palm of your hand, because you're interesting, you love teaching & you love what the students get out of your teaching.

This is your year. 

Happy New YEAR teachers!

Resources for Teaching in London

Classroom Canada website
Guide to Teaching in London: A Survival Guide for Canadians ebook
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Wednesday, August 24, 2011

Absolutely Nothing to do with Teaching in London, England...



The above video has absolutely nothing to do with teaching in London, England but I just had to share it with you here.

Teachers are starting to think about September, and I know there are a few in a panic that they still don't know what they're teaching this year.  Or if they have secure positions, they're panicking that they haven't spent the summer planning each and every unit.  Where did all that free time go?!

Well, not to worry, my fine teacher friends.  Have your students figure out how to make the above machine and you have yourself a wicked physics/math/science/art/design lesson all rolled up in one.   What classroom of active learners wouldn't love such a challenge?

Resources for Teaching in London

Classroom Canada website
Guide to Teaching in London: A Survival Guide for Canadians ebook
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Tuesday, August 23, 2011

Notting Hill Carnival 2011



Over one million people will visit my old neighbourhood this weekend, to participate in Europe's largest street festival, Notting Hill Carnival.  

The festival started in 1964 and has taken place every year, on the August "bank holiday" weekend (which simply means, a long weekend and yes, the banks close), the last long weekend of the summer.  Schools start back up again after the bank holiday, much like in Canada and the USA after Labour Day. It's a Caribbean celebration, but people of all backgrounds attend the events throughout Notting Hill.


Here are a few tips to enjoy Notting Hill Carnival for the first-timer:
  • Bring Water.  Lots of water.  I've seen my neighbours in London selling water out of their kitchen sinks during Carnival!  Be prepared, and make sure you hydrate.
  • Know where the toilets are.  This is important at any festival, but imagine... 1 million people.  Not enough toilets.  Yeah.  Know where they are, and hold that bladder.
  • Sunscreen! I know, I know - London is more often grey than not, but spend a full day at carnival and you'll come home burnt if you don't wear sunscreen. I sound like your mother now, don't I?
  • Bring cash.  Very few people carry cash these days, but the carnival is a good example of when you should.  The food stalls are incredible and you want to be quick. In and out!  So bring cash, get your grub and go.
  • Make sure you know how to get there & how to get home.  Buses are the easiest way to get around Notting Hill during carnival, and the night buses run all night so you should be able to get home no matter where you live.  See here for more details on transportation during Notting Hill Carnival.
  • Watch those pockets!  Sadly, pickpockets have a field day at the carnival, so be smart and hide your valuables on your person and spread them out.  For example, I was pickpocketed on my right hand side but not my left, and was ridiculously excited when I realized that I was smart when dressing and had divided my money into the 2 pockets.  So, although I lost some, I didn't lose it all.  This would be one of those times when you're smart to have a travel pouch under your jeans.  Geeky? Yes.  Smart? Yes. 
  • Layers!  I know you want to wear that sexy little number and shake your booty, but bring some layers for when the sun goes down.  You don't have to dress any differently than you normally would by the way.  Of course, it's a great opportunity to dress colourfully, with heaps of feathers & sequins, but hey, jeans & a t-shirt are just fine at Carnival too.  
Teachers, you'll be starting school the next week so my best advice is to go, have fun & celebrate the end of summer in style. Be safe about it, but have fun.  You deserve it!

Resources for Teaching in London

Classroom Canada website
Guide to Teaching in London: A Survival Guide for Canadians ebook
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Monday, August 22, 2011

RIP Jack Layton



Jack Layton, Canada's NDP leader, passed away this morning.  You can read more about it here

I met Jack  years ago, when I worked at Octopus Books, a small independent bookstore in Ottawa.  Jack had written a book called Homelessness which I was helping to launch.  We organized an event for about 200 people to hear Jack speak on the issue, and I remember having to turn people away.  He was gentle and kind, and spent a few minutes talking with me about the politics around an independent bookstore in the age of Chapters and Amazon.

I'm hopeful that Canada will have another politician with Jack's charisma, but for now, today is for grieving the loss of a great Canadian leader.  Rest in Peace Jack.  You will be missed.

Resources for Teaching in London

Classroom Canada website
Guide to Teaching in London: A Survival Guide for Canadians ebook
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Coffee Time with Classroom Canada alumna - Nicole Trotter (UVic)


In the past, we have highlighted through our regular Coffee Time interviews our wonderful Classroom teachers as they are experiencing life and teaching in London, UK.

Today I'd like to introduce you to another Classroom Canada alumna, Nicole Trotter. Nicole was a teacher in London in 2008/9. She has since returned to Canada, worked as a Kindergarten teacher and is now working on a cruise ship as a youth counsellor!

But she will tell her own story below.

So sit back, relax, grab a latte and enjoy the chat as Nicole tells you about life after London.




Name: Nicole Trotter

University: University of Victoria

Your current job:

I just finished a contract teaching kindergarten at the University of Victoria. On the holidays I tend to do short contracts working as a youth counsellor for a cruise line.

When did you teach in London with Classroom Canada?

I was in London during 2008/2009.

What subjects and age groups did you teach?
Elementary Nursery-Year 6.
So, what are you doing now that you’re back in Canada?
At the moment I am finishing a kindergarten contract at the University of Victoria. I am looking into masters’ programs that will help me gain knowledge in more specific areas and in turn add to my resume making me more employable.
What was the biggest adjustment for you to make when you returned to Canada from your time in London?
When I returned home I was faced with the reality that I would be living at home due to the lack of teaching jobs available on [Vancouver] Island.

How do you think your experience teaching in London influenced your job hunt in Canada?

Sadly it didn't influence my job hunt at all. Regardless of your experience jobs are hard to come by. I have come to admire how different countries structure their education system and aid new teachers in getting into the field of teaching.
What skills did you gain from your experience teaching in London?

This might sound strange but I learned how to view myself as a teacher. Once you are in London your experience or lack of is irrelevant. It is up to you to fake it until you make it. I learned how to have a dozen activities on standby. Most of my skills were learned from observing the teacher aids; they were a great source of information - as well as popular songs - and provided guidance for management strategies in the classroom.
What is the one piece of advice you can offer a Canadian teacher considering the move to London?

My advice would be to go with a friend. Living in another country can be lonely. It is nice to have at least one person who you can hang out with and discuss your teaching experiences. Plan to stay for at least a year, that way you will maximize your visa and gain as much experience as possible.
Teaching in London was a great experience, it helps you grow both as an individual as well as a teacher. If you are fortunate you will have the opportunity to observe some amazing teaching assistants who help break you into the educational system. Working in London gives you the chance to gain real experience as a teacher right away.
Describe your best memory from teaching and living in London.

I remember being in one school in particular, it was one of my regular schools. I was called late, therefore classes had already started by the time I arrived. I had a quick look at the days outline and jumped right in. I remember being really nervous, but in the end I was proud of myself for not only surviving the day, but I left feeling like I did a good job. I was most proud of the days where I overcame what I thought were my limitations. For instance on this particular day there was no plan, so I located one of the great UK websites and developed a very quick lesson plan and hoped for the best.
Would you do it again and why (or why not)?

Yes I would, however I would recommend going with a friend. I wish that I stayed in London longer than I did. If you stick it out for 1-2 years it is more than likely that you will have the opportunity to get a contract and be responsible for a class of your own.

What piece of advice do you have for our Canadian teachers who will be returning to Canada from London soon?

Don't expect this experience to help you in the local job market. Have a back up plan.

Thanks, Nicole!

We are currently interviews teachers who would like to work in London starting in October 2011 & January 2012. To apply, please submit your resume & cover letter to apply AT classroomcanada DOT com.

Resources for Teaching in London


Classroom Canada website
Guide to Teaching in London: A Survival Guide for Canadians ebook
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Canadians & Americans in the UK blog

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Thursday, August 18, 2011

2 Words Teachers Wish They Could Say To Their Students But Can't



Well, the count down to school starting up has started, and I know there are some teachers out there already planning and gearing up for their new classrooms.

And some are starting to bite their nails again, wondering what behaviour management strategies will work this year. I post the above video for the teachers that panic, and worry and wake up in the middle of the night and want you to hear Bob's words clearly.  But I also post the video for the teachers who wish they could just say those magic 2 words to their students.  And I'm sure they do say them every once in a while. But do they work?

Adora Svitak: What adults can learn from kids | Video on TED.com

Adora Svitak: What adults can learn from kids | Video on TED.com

Resources for Teaching in London

Classroom Canada website
Guide to Teaching in London: A Survival Guide for Canadians ebook
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Monday, August 15, 2011

Students Teaching Students - Embracing Technology in Teaching



Thanks to Joanne Jacobs for posting the video above on her blog and inspiring me to do the same today.

Eric Marcos is an American teacher who embraces technology and the idea of students learning through teaching other students.  He has his students create you tube videos to explain math concepts. They use their words, their voices and their own explanations. As you can see from the video above, it seems to work really well.

I'm also a big fan of peer-to-peer tutoring and teaching, and know for a fact that it works really well in my classrooms.  "Think-Pair-Share" is a phrase I learned in teacher's college and again while teaching in London, England.  I'm also a fan of using technology in the classroom, although I may not go so far as to embrace the use of mobile phones in class.

I imagine that there are heaps of teachers doing this kind of thing in London, England although I haven't personally seen it myself.  What do you think?  Would you have your students create you tube videos to explain difficult concepts whether in math or any other subject? 

I have used plenty of you tube videos to explain algebra to my students, but never videos by students themselves.  I'm not sure why that is but I suspect it's just that I do a simple search on you tube for the concept I need and pick the first one that comes up - which tends to be a fairly slick little video with a simple instruction that my students can understand.  But if I had the choice between a child explaining the concept, and an adult - I must admit, I'd choose the child first.

So perhaps we need to take Eric Marcos' example and start applying it in our own classrooms?  If our students make their own videos, won't they be more inclined to actually watch their peers and learn from them?  That's the thinking behind peer-to-peer tutoring anyway.  Why isn't this more common?  Am I missing something obvious for why we aren't embracing this simple technology? 

Resources for Teaching in London

Classroom Canada website
Guide to Teaching in London: A Survival Guide for Canadians ebook
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Friday, August 12, 2011

I Love London: Bryn the Brit Finds a Silver Lining

Today's blog post is a repost from Bryn the Brit, one of our teaching assistants in London, England.  Thanks Bryn!

I Love London

By now, you will have heard about (or experienced first-hand) the senseless violence of the UK Riots. You will probably also have heard about the thousands of people who rallied to clean up our communities. We've seen both the worst and the best in people over the last few days.

Here's some more of the best...


I live very close to Peckham. If you heard about the Peckham bus fire, that was within spitting distance of my home. It's a neighbourhood that often gets a bad rap because it's full of folks who are unemployed and--I hate to say it but--black. And yet when I went out for a walk the morning after the riot, the streets had already been cleaned, the vandalised shops were open for business, and there was a good feeling in the air. There was definitely a sense of "keep calm and carry on," but more than that there was a sense of community.

It wasn't long before the "I love Peckham" project sprang up. A couple of girls have taken it upon themselves to spend their days handing out post-it notes and marker pens to the locals and sticking up the community's thoughts for the world to see. When I stopped by yesterday, I saw a man I remembered from photos someone else had taken. He was there to give the girls a bouquet of flowers.

It just goes to show that even when this city is at its lowest point, it's still full of heart. In a city this big, where it's easy to go through each day without any meaningful interaction with those around us, sometimes it takes a tragedy to remind us of that. I love Peckham and I love London. I feel so very lucky to live here.

Resources for Teaching in London

Classroom Canada website
Guide to Teaching in London: A Survival Guide for Canadians ebook
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Tuesday, August 9, 2011

Riots in London: Where's the Positive In All This Madness?




Oh London, my London, our London.  I love you and I will always love you but these senseless riots have got to stop.  It's been three days now and the news is sad and only getting worse.  Every morning I wake up hoping to hear something has happened to turn the tide of violence throughout the city, and every morning I just read more terrible news.

My facebook feed is full of our teachers talking about the riots in London, that they're safe & sound but worried about their students.  They're updating the friends and family back home and showing pictures of the high streets and looting.  The neighbourhoods I taught in the most have been hit hard.  I know the students and their families well and I have no idea now how they're doing.  I can only hope my students aren't involved at all.


The amazing thing about London is its ability to cope in a crisis. I know it seems strange to say this, but I was living in North London during the 2007 bus and tube bombings, and living there is different than reading about it on the news or seeing it on television.  People get through. They really do "Keep calm and carry on" in London.  Minus the rioters of course!  But everyone else.


The video above was posted by one of our teachers and it really struck home for me.  That's the London I know and love.  Watch it.  See what I mean.  And just think - what would you do in their situation?  Stay at home, complain, moan...or get out your "bin bags" and gloves, tweet and facebook about the clean up and meet your neighbours on the streets to get out there and take the neighbourhood back?

Resources for Teaching in London

Classroom Canada website
Guide to Teaching in London: A Survival Guide for Canadians ebook
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Monday, August 8, 2011

Mobile Phones in the Classroom: To Ban or To Embrace?

It's not often that a blog post on issues in education will cause me to stop in my tracks and go "whoa there...hang on a minute! You're talking crazy talk now..."

I was just reading Mr D's blog, I Want to Teach Forever when I came across his post about embracing cell phones in the classroom.  I consider myself to be a fairly "new school" teacher, embracing technology in the classroom, teaching students with smart boards, and blogging as a teaching and learning tool.  But embracing cell phones in the classroom?  Really?

Won't students just text each other? Won't they just be on facebook and google+? You tube?  Wikipedia? Won't they cheat, text, msn? 

And why do I feel like I sound like an "old school" teacher, resistent to change, refusing to embrace new technologies (which frankly, cell phones aren't!), and most importantly - not trusting of the students themselves?

Where do you stand?  Do you use cell phones in your classroom? Would you?  Could you?

Resources for Teaching in London

Classroom Canada website
Guide to Teaching in London: A Survival Guide for Canadians ebook
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Thursday, August 4, 2011

Canadian & American Teachers in London, England: Teaching Tips for New Teachers


Phil Beadle is a well known educator in the United Kingdom and one that Canadian & American teachers should follow.  He is probably most famous for his show, The Unteachables, a British television show about taking Britain's toughest students and teaming them up with the best teachers.  It's a great show & one I recommend teachers to watch if they can get their hands on it.

All teachers should watch the short you tube video above for Beadle's top tips for new teachers.  One of the biggest challenges about moving to teach in London is knowing the education system & how to handle the cultural differences between Canada, the USA and the UK, but watching videos like the one above will actually really help you.  It seems quite a few of his videos have been uploaded to you tube, so search for his name & I'm sure you'll find quite a bit on there that will help you adjust to teaching in London.

Beadle also wrote a few books, with the most recent being How to Teach which seems to only be available in the UK and the USA, but not Canada.  I'm not sure if other countries are able to get the book.  Canadians can order the book from the US through amazon, but expect to pay customs.  I'm tempted to order one myself!

Any other top tips for new teachers?  Especially for those about to teach in the UK?  Please leave your comments below & share your two pence.


Resources for Teaching in London

Classroom Canada website
Guide to Teaching in London: A Survival Guide for Canadians ebook
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Wednesday, August 3, 2011

Coffee Time with Classroom Canada alumna - Shannon Mullen

In the past, we have highlighted through our regular Coffee Time interviews our wonderful Classroom teachers as they are experiencing life and teaching in London, UK.

Today I'd like to introduce you to another Classroom Canada alumna, Shannon Mullen. Shannon was a teacher in London in 2009. (You can read her original coffee time interview here.) She has since returned to Canada, received her M.Ed. and is now headed to British Columbia for a full-time teaching job.

But she will tell her own story below.

So sit back, relax, grab a latte and enjoy the chat as Shannon tells you about life after London.




Name: Shannon Mullen

University: OISE/UT

Your current job:
Full-time M.Ed. student and fitness instructor in Toronto but am moving to BC at the end of the summer for a teaching job!

When did you teach in London with Classroom Canada?
September 2009-July 2010

What subjects and age groups did you teach?
I started out doing daily supply- all ages and grade levels, both primary and secondary. I taught Year 9 and Year 11 English at one school from November to April, and taught Year 8,9,10 English, Year 8 &9 Drama, and Year 10 Citizenship at another school from April to July.
So, what are you doing now that you’re back in Canada?
I'm doing my Master's of Education and working as a fitness instructor in Toronto.
What was the biggest adjustment for you to make when you returned to Canada from your time in London?
I LOVE travel and adventure...so it was hard for me to be stuck in one place. In London, I literally spent every penny I made travelling and took every opportunity to explore and visit new places. Since I'm a student, I'm not making any money, so don't have an income to spend on adventure!! But, I've enjoyed the opportunity to spend time with the people I missed while I was away!

How do you think your experience teaching in London influenced your job hunt in Canada?
I actually was just hired as a full-time teacher (high school Phys. Ed. and Outdoor Ed.) in BC, so having the year of experience definitely helped!! Having one year of teaching experience was also a requirement for my Master's program, so the year in London really helped me.
What skills did you gain from your experience teaching in London?
I'm a pretty laid-back and flexible person, but being in London taught me to just "go with the flow." Especially when I did daily supply teaching, I was often thrown into situations completely unprepared. This has made me so much less stressed about my upcoming teaching position, which I'll actually be able to plan ahead for. I also taught many subjects that were out of my comfort zone (ie. Drama), but found that I actually was quite good at it. I think being a Phys. Ed. teacher, I'm used to a bit of "controlled chaos" and active games, so was able to apply these experiences to the drama class. I guess my experience in London taught me to be open to new experiences and opportunities that I may have not anticipated.
What is the one piece of advice you can offer a Canadian teacher considering the move to London?
I would suggest having a bit of money saved up. I did not. I actually spent the summer backpacking in Alaska before moving to London, so my London funds were very minimal. I survived and got through it, which was part of the adventure, but it definitely made it very stressful at first. If I were to do it again, I'd probably would have worked the summer before coming.
Describe your best memory from teaching and living in London.
My best memory in London was when my position ended at one school, a group of Year 7s were so upset (I'd started up a basketball club at the school) that they started a petition to keep me at the school and gave it to the headteacher. I cried. It was cute.
Would you do it again and why (or why not)?
Yes, I would definitely do it again. I learned alot about myself and travelled to 20 countries in one year!!!

What piece of advice do you have for our Canadian teachers who will be returning to Canada from London soon?
Make the most of your time there and see as much as you can. Like I said, I maxed out all financial resources before returning to Canada...so had to sleep on my brother's couch when I got home until I saved up enough rent money...but you are there for the experience! Make the most of it. It will all work out in the end!!
Anything else you’d like to add?
I absolutely loved my time in London. It is an amazing city. There were definitely ups and downs, especially in the classroom, but I came out of the experience as a stronger teacher and person.


Thanks, Shannon!

We are currently interviews teachers who would like to work in London starting in October 2011 & January 2012. To apply, please submit your resume & cover letter to apply AT classroomcanada DOT com.

Resources for Teaching in London


Classroom Canada website
Guide to Teaching in London: A Survival Guide for Canadians ebook
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Canadians & Americans in the UK blog

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Teaching Jobs for Canadian & American Teachers in London, England

There are still a few spots left for teachers wishing to teach in London, England this upcoming school term.  If you are looking for a teaching job, or know an excelent teacher who would do well teaching diverse students from around the world in an inner city school, please contact us right away.

Interview spots are quite limited at this stage, but we have a few for the right teachers.  Specifically, we're looking for teachers with strong behaviour management skills, flexibility & a positive attitude in life & teaching.  Ideally teachers will be able to teach across 2 of 3 areas: Primary, Secondary & SEN teaching. 

To apply, simply submit your cover letter & CV to apply AT classroomcanada DOT com.  I recommend that you spend some time on this blog looking at the testimonials above, and searching through the posts for our advice on how to ace your interview, write your cover letter & CV, and the qualities of successful teachers.   You could also read my award winning ebook, Guide to Teaching in London: A Survival Guide for Canadians.

Resources for Teaching in London

Classroom Canada website
Guide to Teaching in London: A Survival Guide for Canadians ebook
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Canadians & Americans in the UK blog

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Tuesday, August 2, 2011

Why I Love Music Teachers And You Should Too

Music teachers rock.

And here's why.

They shape & mold these incredible young people, giving them the confidence & courage to peform and remain behind the shadows when they do succeed. You don't hear about the music teachers when a band wins a big contest, or signs a record deal, or plays their first big gig.  But the teacher is probably there, in the background, quietly cheering them on. 

Yesterday, I had the pleasure of attending & participating in BC Day, a celebration of the province of British Columbia.  There was a Garage Band LIVE contest for local indie musicians to "audition" for the soundtrack and/or compilation CD for the movie, LOCKED IN A GARAGE BAND.  We had no idea how the day would go and were a bit nervous about the whole thing, but suspected we'd have no problem getting the bands out.  27 ended up performing, and 6 were turned away due to lack of time for them to perform.  Each band or solo artist got to peform one song in front of a live audience and a panel of judges.  At the end of the day, one band won "Best Garage Band" and a prize package worth $5000.

That band was Victoria's own The Archers, a group of 5 friends who just graduated high school.  I stood near the back of the room, and when they won, I heard two women squeeling behind me.  One was their teacher, the other that teacher's sister.  And it got me thinking - how many teachers go to their student's performances in the summer? 

My younger brother studied music in the 90's, and still talks to his music teacher from high school.  That teacher guided him, and gave him the courage to perform and continue in his passion for music. 

My friend Sophia was the Emcee for the Garage Band LIVE event and she's a high school music teacher from Toronto.  She got what the day was all about, and loved seeing the bands really going for it on stage. Her students keep her updated on their progress as well.

I'm no music teacher, but I think I get it too.  It's about standing back, watching them rock out and being so very excited for their success.  I'm sure their teachers can hear the "mistakes" and know what to teach them next, but really, their love for teaching music and being there long after the school day ends is what keeps us all coming back for more.

So, thank you music teachers.  Thank you for showing up. Thank you for being there. Thank you for staying friends with the students and encouraging them. It's your dedication that keeps the music playing.

Resources for Teaching in London

Classroom Canada website
Guide to Teaching in London: A Survival Guide for Canadians ebook
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Monday, August 1, 2011

Teach in London: How to find accommodations



We constantly get asked for advice on the best way to find accommodations if our applicants do not get (or do not want) a place in our subsidized housing complex.


There's information included in our Guide to Teaching in London e-book about accommodation options. We've written blog posts in the past on how to sort out your own accommodations and recommendations for inexpensive hotels.

Well...now we have another idea from one of our recent teacher candidates who arrived in London last month. She recommended a company called Arrive Homes that helped her find a great, inexpensive, safe place to live in London.

Here is what she had to say about Arrive Homes:


I have been in London for about a week now and have already found a great place to live and have been to IKEA to get all the things I may need in my new house! I wanted to share that arrivehomes.co.uk are AMAZING! They are two young guys who place young professionals (lots of teachers) in house shares all over London. They were great in the lead up to getting over here and we met up right away and they showed me 4 places in one day. I fell in love with the last and all has been easy since! The places are really affordable (they range 5-600 pounds max) and they are all in safe neighbourhoods and near tube stations.

Just thought I would let you know!

Thanks, Maggie for sharing this great resource and if any others out there have ideas on how to find great housing in London, please post below.

We are currently interviews teachers who would like to work in London starting in October 2011 or January 2012. To apply, please submit your resume & cover letter to apply AT classroomcanada DOT com.

Resources for Teaching in London

Classroom Canada website
Guide to Teaching in London: A Survival Guide for Canadians ebook
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