Tuesday, June 30, 2009

Canada Day Abroad: Videos To Inspire Discussion About What It Means to be Canadian

With tomorrow's Canada Day celebrations around the world, and our teachers celebrating from coast to coast, in China, the Bahamas, Japan and of course, London, England it gets me thinking about what it means to be Canadian.

Before I moved to England to teach I was fairly typical in defining my Canadian-ness as simply "not American." The video below really demonstrates that idea. It's a few years old now, but this beer company really hit the nail on the head in terms of defining what many Canadians believe to be our Canadian-ness.


But then when I lived in London, in one of the world's most diverse cities, I started to realize that my definition of "not American" wasn't really enough. Most of my friends were Australian, New Zealander, British, Zimbabwean and South African. I didn't know many Americans & Canadians when I taught in London. So, I learned that for me, being Canadian was so much more than simply not American. It also means having a massive land mass with plenty of personal space between us. (I really learned that lesson when I did a teaching practicum in Bangladesh, but that's a story for another day.)

We are a multicultural country, but in so many ways we are just at the very beginning of this transformation. We are a little baby compared to England - we're still so young in comparison. I find the video of "Joe" above to be a funny one, and outdated in what I would define Canadian as now. He's white, wearing a plaid shirt, and likely listening to the Tragically Hip. Sure, that's one part of our Canadian-ness, but what about all the other cultures represented in Canada?

When I looked for the Joe video in You Tube, another video came up as recommended viewing. "I am a Muslim" is an American video, but it looks almost like a direct response to the "I Am Canadian" Video above. Check it out below.


I love this video and really think we should have a new "I am Canadian" video to show what our diversity is really all about. It can't be a beer commercial (in case you don't already know, Muslims don't generally drink alcohol), and frankly, I'm not that keen on a beer company defining Canadian-ness for us all anyway.

What would you want in an "I Am Canadian" video that is more representative of our Canada today? What would you want to show your students abroad?

If you'd like to become part of the Classroom Canada team, please sign up for our newsletters & apply through our website. Be sure to read the Guide to Teaching in London: A Survival Guide for Canadians to help you understand everything you need to know about teaching in London.

Monday, June 29, 2009

Teaching in the UK: Behaviour Management Strategies That Work

I have a group of Canadian teachers from coast to coast preparing to teach in the UK in the fall. I also have a few American teachers preparing to teach in London. Everyone wants to know what they should be doing to prepare for teaching in England.

Besides reading this blog, and my ebook, I always tell them to start reading books and websites about behaviour management strategies that work.

Managing the behaviour of the students in London is the biggest adjustment for our teachers to make - they always say it's hard and no, they can't explain why it's hard. It just is. It doesn't matter if you have 10 years experience in Toronto inner city schools (although that will certainly help!), or if you just graduated in May from teacher's college.

The best ways to prepare are to: read more, talk to experienced teachers from London and watch more videos on Teachers TV.

Here's a blog I really enjoy: Sup Teach? I just stumbled across it this morning, and found this particular post to be very helpful. The blog is a collective one, with 8 contributors, similar to our Classroom Canada Teachers blog. One of their contributors, Eyawn, offers this advice in regards to behaviour management:

"I never have arguments with students. It just doesn't happen. I'm not saying I have great relationships with all my kids; a few of them hate my guts, I'm sure. But I definitely AM saying I never have arguments. Ever. What's the secret?

"I understand."

The end-all phrase. The argument killer. I can almost guarantee it's effectiveness."

Read the rest of the post here. And I completely agree - those 2 words are like magic.

Here are a few more blog posts about behaviour management from yours truly:


If you'd like to become part of the Classroom Canada team, please sign up for our newsletters & apply through our website. Be sure to read the Guide to Teaching in London: A Survival Guide for Canadians to help you understand everything you need to know about teaching in London.

Friday, June 26, 2009

Reason #55 to Teach in London, England: Graffiti Artist Banksy Verses Bristol Museum


Here's another reason to teach in London: Banksy. Have you heard of him yet?

"He's like Batman but better!" says one of the patrons in the above video.

His pieces now sell for thousands of pounds, where elsewhere his art would be called graffiti and a public nuisance.

Similar blogposts:


If you'd like to become part of the Classroom Canada team, please sign up for our newsletters & apply through our website. Be sure to read the Guide to Teaching in London: A Survival Guide for Canadians to help you understand everything you need to know about teaching in London.

Thursday, June 25, 2009

Secondary School Teacher Jobs for September 2009

Classroom Canada is still recruiting teachers for September 2009 positions. Specifically, we are requesting applications from teachers who can teach secondary age pupils in the following subject areas:
  • Economics
  • Business
  • Science (Chemistry, Biology, Physics)
  • Math
  • Law
Here's an example of an email I just received from one of our secondary schools in London:

"We are still looking for an Economics teacher to teach A level and possibly some Business Studies to GCSE but the main emphasis must be the Economics.

We are looking for someone with a proven record of teaching A level Economics and gaining creditable results for their students and we want to see references that reflect this."
This school is really struggling to find the right teacher, which is fairly typical for the subject matter & the time of year. Some subject areas just don't have enough teachers able to teach to the levels our schools need.

Allow me to translate the email into Canadian-speak for you. They want an Economics teacher that can teach up to grade 12 and 13, with Business Studies to grade 11. Ideally, this teacher will have experience and the proof to show that they have raised the grades for the students in those subjects. If you don't have experience, and have just graduated from teachers college, then your practicum reports & references need to be extremely positive.

For all other subjects & teachers, we are still accepting applications for October & November arrivals, and for January 2010. Primary, Special Needs and Secondary Teachers (all subjects) are invited to send resumes and cover letters to apply at classroomcanada dot com right away.
If you want to teach in the UK, then please do apply right away.

If you'd like to become part of the Classroom Canada team, please sign up for our newsletters & apply through our website. Be sure to read the Guide to Teaching in London: A Survival Guide for Canadians to help you understand everything you need to know about teaching in London.


Wednesday, June 24, 2009

Canadian Teachers & Royal Ascot


As promised, our teachers have sent photos from their day at Royal Ascot this past weekend. It was worth the wait!

I take a lot of pride in how our teachers meet & become great friends through Classroom Canada. Daniela, Alex and Erika are a classic example of our community of Canadian & American teachers in London. Daniela went to OISE (U of T), Alex went to Queen's and Erika went to UBC. They all met in London at our Classroom Canada London Scavenger Hunt last year and managed to win 250 pounds worth of travel vouchers from Topdeck Travel. They also became great friends.

Alex sent me this email to explain their day at Royal Ascot with Topdeck:

"We had a great day out with Topdeck! Those Aussie's sure know how to party. We left south west London around 9am and arrived at Ascot at 10am. Everyone piled out of the buses and magically produced picnic blankets and baskets (seriously, I did not see one person carrying anything larger than a clutch when boarding the bus).

Anyway, the carpark quickly filled with coaches from all over the place. Everyone was sprawled out across the lawn, sipping morning champagne and looking fabulous. It honestly was the poshest tailgate party I have ever attended! The British sure know how pre-party!

We lunched and drank for a few hours before heading off to see the Queen, which was AMAZING. Daniella was particularly excited. We snapped some photos from the Silver Ring and then headed off to make some bets.

I know nothing about gambling and decided that I would only place one bet for the hell of it. I couldn't return from Ascot to tell people that I hadn't done any betting, could I?!

I picked my horse based solely on it's name... which has to be a girl thing. Anyway, my horse won it's race unexpectedly. The odds were 20 to 1 (which I later discovered). I had bet 2 pounds each way and walked away with 90 pounds! YES for random gambling luck!

The rest of our afternoon was spent watching the races, sipping fruit filled Pim's (I LOVE PIMS!), commenting on hats and general attire. It was a seriously fabulous day!

Hope you like the photos! Let me know if you want any more details!
xoxo
Alex"

Here are more photos from their day out.


The Queen is in the back of the carriage above. See the spot of blue on the right?





Well ladies, that's how to dress at Royal Ascot. Great hats, gorgeous dresses, with champagne in hand. Thanks to Alex, Daniela and Erika for letting me share their photos & story with you all.

If you'd like to become part of the Classroom Canada team, please sign up for our newsletters & apply through our website. Be sure to read the Guide to Teaching in London: A Survival Guide for Canadians to help you understand everything you need to know about teaching in London.

Tuesday, June 23, 2009

Reason #54 to Teach in England: Royal Ascot

To carry on from my post called 52 Reasons to Teach in London, England, and yesterday's 53rd reason, here is Reason #54 to teach in England - Royal Ascot.

Here's the back story:

At last year's Classroom Canada Scavenger Hunt, Top Deck Travel gave our winning team 250 pounds worth of travel vouchers to use towards one of their trips. The group of 4-5 teachers decided to use their vouchers to go to Royal Ascot, an annual event that dates back to 1711.

They've promised us photos so we can see for ourselves what it's really like to attend the horse races as Canadian teachers. Watch this space!

I really hope that they attended on ladies day, the day where ladies wear hats and fancy dresses, something I just can't wrap my little Canadian head around. Where do they get these funny hats? How do they decide which one to wear? How big is too big? How many feathers? Why do British women love their hats so much?

I did a bit of research to help me in writing this blog post, and the funny thing is that when I searched for videos about Royal Ascot, two came up first. The top 2 videos on You Tube about Royal Ascot horse racing have nothing to do with horses.

One was a video to show men how to dress at Ascot, and the other a video to show the ladies' outfits in 2008. So, I think I've discovered the real reason people go to this event every year - the fashion.

Have you ever been? And if so, what's it like? Do tell all!

If you've never been, would you want to go? What kind of hat would you wear if you're a "lady"? If you're a "gentleman" what would you put on?

Here are the videos I mentioned:


Monday, June 22, 2009

Reason #53 to Teach in London, England: Wimbledon!

Wimbledon 2009 started today in London. As if you needed yet another reason to move to London to teach!

For all those Canadian & American teachers in London, I hope you take advantage of this amazing event and get down to Wimbledon after school. It's easy to get onto Centre Court if it's raining!

I saw Serena Williams play with an injured knee in 2004 on centre court and it only cost about 12 pounds to get in. It was incredible. And boy, did it rain. But I didn't care. I was at Centre Court watching Serena Williams at Wimbledon! It was a dream come true.

For all those teachers doing research into teaching in the UK, just think: you could be at Wimbledon on this day next year. Lucky you!

If you'd like to become part of the Classroom Canada team, please sign up for our newsletters & apply through our website. Be sure to read the Guide to Teaching in London: A Survival Guide for Canadians to help you understand everything you need to know about teaching in London.

Friday, June 19, 2009

The Importance of Taking Time Out

Tis the season for end-of-the-school-year stress, freak outs, panic attacks, and all round manic behaviour for those us helping teachers to find jobs in the UK.  In some ways, this is my favourite time of year.  I thrive on the buzz of a busy day.

But I also recognize when stress takes its toll and I need to step back, reflect and just relax. It all works out in the end. It always does.  This time of year is always a bit crazy and if I take one day out of it all, it won't all collapse around me.

So, my niece Sophie is 6 years old and very good at all things academic.  She's at the top of her class, and I have no doubt that skipping school for one day won't hurt her one bit - particularly on a Friday of the last couple weeks of school.  Hey, I was a teacher right? I know the teachers are just trying to get through to the end, and there's not a whole lot of learning going on.

Sophie loves all things Chinese.  I have no idea why Chinese over all other cultures, but I encourage her to explore her fascination.  She has Chinese clothes, watches Chinese shows, learns Chinese writing and loves Chinese food.  It's the sweetest thing.  

All of this is to say, I'm playing hooky with Sophie today and going to "Chinese town."   I'm so excited to see what kinds of things she becomes fascinated with. I've promised her that we will buy "Chinese sticks" (aka chop sticks) and that she can get another small thing.  I wonder what she'll choose?  I have a feeling that Hello Kitty will be on the top of her list.  

Have a great weekend!  What kinds of things do you do when you need to just step away from it all?

If you'd like to become part of the Classroom Canada team, please sign up for our newsletters & apply through our website. Be sure to read the Guide to Teaching in London: A Survival Guide for Canadians to help you understand everything you need to know about teaching in London.

Thursday, June 18, 2009

Carnival of Education Goes Hiking

This week, Pat Hensley takes us on a hiking trip with the Carnival of Education.  I love this idea!

Go check it out.  Loads of fabulous bloggers have contributed their favourite blog posts in regards to education, including Classroom Canada.  We contributed "Gay Teachers Abroad: What's it like to teach abroad as a foreign gay teacher?"

I really enjoyed these posts:
What post should I contribute for the next carnival?  I find it hard to choose just one, so any suggestions you have will be great.

If you'd like to become part of the Classroom Canada team, please sign up for our newsletters & apply through our website. Be sure to read the Guide to Teaching in London: A Survival Guide for Canadians to help you understand everything you need to know about teaching in London.

Wednesday, June 17, 2009

Classroom Canada Turns 2: Celebrate With Us!

I can hardly believe that almost 2 years have passed since I first moved back to Canada to start Classroom Canada - the teaching agency that would raise the bar for all other agencies and really help Canadian teachers to understand everything they need in order to succeed in their teaching careers in London, England.

Our 2nd birthday is on July 19th, the day I flew home from London after teaching & recruiting there for three years.  So what should we do to celebrate?

Well, normally I would throw a big party to thank everyone involved in our success, but of course, that's kind of hard to do given that our teachers are in England, scattered across Canada and America and there are even a few in China, Japan and the Bahamas.  But I still want to have a party!

A virtual party it will be.  It's the last weekend of school for our teachers in London and a Sunday - a great day to go online and "party" with us.  So, here's what I propose:  

Come online on Sunday, July 19th and wish us a Happy Birthday.  

Win prizes!  Yes, that's right. You don't have to give us gifts, but we'll give them to you simply because we can and everyone loves to win.

I'll be on this blog and twitter, giving away awesome prizes and celebrating 2 years of helping amazing teachers make the move to London, England.  

Who knows? Maybe our sponsors will even throw in some travel vouchers, or free flights (travel companies? Are you out there?), or free travel tours (come on Top Deck, I know you want to :-) ).  

But just like throwing a real party, I worry that no one will show up. I am only human after all. Will you come to our party?  What do you think I should give away as prizes?

If you'd like to become part of the Classroom Canada team, please sign up for our newsletters & apply through our website. Be sure to read the Guide to Teaching in London: A Survival Guide for Canadians to help you understand everything you need to know about teaching in London.

Tuesday, June 16, 2009

75% of Teachers in OECD Countries Feel They Lack Incentives to Improve Their Teaching

The OECD (Organization for Economic & Cooperative Development) just published the results of the TALIS - Teaching & Learning International Survey, where they studied 23 countries and examined teacher preparedness, professional development, rewards and incentives.  

The countries they studied are: Australia, Austria, Belgium (Flemish Community), Brazil, Bulgaria, Denmark, Estonia, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Korea, Lithuania, Malaysia, Malta, Mexico, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovak Republic, Slovenia, Spain and Turkey.

They looked at approximately 200 schools in each country, with one principal completing the survey for each school, and a random selection of about 20 teachers per school.

The results are interesting to say the least.  

Here's the big one: 3 out of 4 teachers feel they don't receive any incentives to improve their teaching practice.  Not exactly uplifting news for this Tuesday morning.

Here are my personal favourites from the report:
  • On average, teachers spend 13% of classroom time maintaining order, but in Brazil and Malaysia the proportions rises to more than 17%. In Bulgaria, Estonia, Lithuania and Poland, by contrast, less than 10% of classroom time is lost in this way.
  • Aside from classroom disturbances, other factors hindering instruction included student absenteeism (46%), students turning up late for class (39%), profanity and swearing (37%), and intimidation or verbal abuse of other students (35%).
  • Along with the lack of incentives for improvement, teachers in some countries do not even undergo any systematic appraisal or receive any feedback on their work.  This is the case for more than 25% of teachers in Ireland and Portugal, 45% in Spain and 55% in Italy.
If only Canada and the UK were a part of this report!  I have a feeling that our teachers would say more than 13% of their time is spent managing student behaviour in London classrooms.

This is the first study of its kind, so let's hope that there are more international studies looking at teaching practice in the future.



What do you think?  Are you surprised by any of these results?  In your own experience, would your school agree with this report?

If you'd like to become part of the Classroom Canada team, please sign up for our newsletters & apply through our website. Be sure to read the Guide to Teaching in London: A Survival Guide for Canadians to help you understand everything you need to know about teaching in London.

Monday, June 15, 2009

Movies to Watch Before Moving to Live in London, England


I've probably watched The Holiday at least twenty times. I can't help it. I just love this movie. When I find myself missing my life in London, I watch The Holiday. Yes, I am a total romantic.

It's at this time of year that my teachers in Canada & America email or call me more often to ask what they should be doing to prepare for their upcoming journey to teaching in London, England.
They read this blog, my book, watch documentaries on Teachers TV, participate in online discussion groups, and network with our other teachers already in London.

But I always tell them to relax and watch movies set in London as well. Whether you're male or female, there are plenty of great films set in London. It's a great way to feel excited about your upcoming journey and will give you a better sense of the geography. Then, when you actually are living in London, watch the same movies again and notice how different you perceive the movie now that you know the city better.

Here are a few of my personal favourites:
  • The New Bond Movies - always have scenes set in London
  • Bridget Jones Diary - of course!
  • To Sir With Love
  • Bend it Like Beckham
  • Fever Pitch
  • Love Actually
  • Notes on a Scandal (filmed in one of the schools I help find teachers)
  • Notting Hill
  • Scenes of a Sexual Nature (filmed in Hamstead Heath, a great park that you will likely spend some time in if you teach in London)
  • Shaun of the Dead
  • Four Weddings &  A Funeral
What about you? Any great flicks that you'd like to add to this list? Please share your comments below.

And for those lucky teachers currently in London, Jude Law is performing in the West End as Hamlet.   Please go and see it and report back to me.  I absolutely love the West End and was lucky enough to see Holly Hunter, David Schwimmer and Kim Cattrall in different plays when I lived in London.  Yet another reason to teach in the UK!

If you'd like to become part of the Classroom Canada team, please sign up for our newsletters & apply through our website. Be sure to read the Guide to Teaching in London: A Survival Guide for Canadians to help you understand everything you need to know about teaching in London.

Friday, June 12, 2009

Professional Development Meme 2009

I was recently introduced to Siobhan Curious by Sarah Ebner through blogging and love both their work. I visited Siobhan's blog today and discovered that she's participating in this Professional Development Meme and I want to too! Here's how it works:

Directions:

Summer can be a great time for professional development. It is an opportunity to learn more about a topic, read a particular work or the works of a particular author, beef up an existing unit of instruction, advance one’s technical skills, work on that advanced degree or certification, pick up a new hobby, and finish many of the other items on our ever-growing To Do Lists. Let’s make Summer 2009 a time when we actually get to accomplish a few of those things and enjoy the thrill of marking them off our lists.

The Rules:

NOTE: You do NOT have to wait to be tagged to participate in this meme.

*Pick 1-3 professional development goals and commit to achieving them this summer.
* For the purposes of this activity the end of summer will be Labor Day (09/07/09).
* Post the above directions along with your 1-3 goals on your blog.
* Title your post Professional Development Meme 2009 and link back/trackback to http://clifmims.com/blog/archives/2447.
* Use the following tag/ keyword/ category on your post: pdmeme09.
* Tag 5-8 others to participate in the meme.
* Achieve your goals and “develop professionally.”
* Commit to sharing your results on your blog during early or mid-September.

My Professional Development Goals for Summer of 2009

  1. Learn how to create a course through Edu20.org for teachers who want to know more about teaching in the UK. It's a website that I wrote more about here.  My summer goal is to spend more time navigating my way around the site and to come up with some sort of a course for our teachers & blog readers.
  2. Learn how to drive a car.  I know this might seem a bit strange, but I never learned how to drive and it's a real pain to go to university fairs across Canada without a car.  I always use the excuse that I bike and take public transit in the big city (Londoners really don't need cars after all), but admit that I'm also just very very scared.  Silly scared.  Cry in my hands as I try to figure out which "button" is the clutch and which is the break, and know that neither is actually called  a button.
  3. Read Learn Me Good by John Pearson of Learn Me Good Blog, my new favourite teacher blogger.
I am Tagging:
If you'd like to become part of the Classroom Canada team, please sign up for our newsletters & apply through our website. Be sure to read the Guide to Teaching in London: A Survival Guide for Canadians to help you understand everything you need to know about teaching in London.

Thursday, June 11, 2009

What do Canadians do in London, England for Canada Day?


Canadians tend to really celebrate Canada Day when they're in Ottawa or abroad.  Here in Victoria, BC we have a bit of a street party with fireworks and musicians, but after growing up in Ottawa I see any less than a million people as a small party.

Now, I see London as the place to be for Canada Day!  It's mayhem!  It used to be that Canadians in London would go to the Maple Leaf pub on Canada Day, and it always turned into a massive street party because the pub couldn't contain us all.  Drinking in the streets is acceptable in London, so we'd all grab six packs of Canadian beer from the Canada Shop down the street and celebrate in London style.   A few of the restaurants even make poutine for us. My favourite was from a Thai restaurant. How cool is that?  They don't use real cheese curds, so it's really not the real Canadian poutine, but still, I enjoyed it.

But a few years ago, the World Cup was on at the same time as Canada Day and the powers that be decided that it wasn't safe to have a few thousand Canadians on the street celebrating at the same time as the World Cup fanatics would be pouring out of the pubs happy or angry depending on their soccer preference.  As a Canadian, of course, I saw this as ridiculous and went anyway.  My friends had to line up to get in, and it all seemed very anti-climatic.  

At the time, someone organized a Canada Day party in Trafalgar Square to try to encourage all of us to go to a larger, more organized & contained street party.  The problem was that it wasn't actually on Canada Day.  They organized it for a few days before if I recall correctly.  I'm sure it had to do with paperwork & bureaucracy, but it just doesn't feel right to be celebrating Canada Day abroad on the wrong day.   Let's face it - the whole thing is about feeling nostalgic, and imagining your friends & family "back home" celebrating with you from across the globe.  That just doesn't work if it's on the wrong day.

Now, Canada Day in London is on Canada Day - July 1st!  Yes.  They got it right.  Many Canadians will still try to carry on the tradition of going to the Maple Leaf Pub in Covent Garden, but I suspect that the majority will go to Trafalgar Square to see the live acts, drink in the street, eat poutine, play street hockey and all round be Canadian in London.   Last year, plenty of the Classroom Canada teachers partied in style in Trafalgar Square so I suspect they'll repeat the tradition.


I had some temporary tattoos made for our teachers and Morgan, a new teacher from Victoria, will be bringing them to our London office next week when she arrives to start her teaching there.  I hope they make the teachers smile & feel just a little bit proud to be a Canadian Teacher in London on that day.   

Next year, I think I'll have balloons made instead.  What do you think?  Any other ideas for Canada Day?  Where will you be?

If you'd like to become part of the Classroom Canada team, please sign up for our newsletters & apply through our website. Be sure to read the Guide to Teaching in London: A Survival Guide for Canadians to help you understand everything you need to know about teaching in London.

Wednesday, June 10, 2009

Teaching Assistants Required for London, England


In addition to recruiting primary, secondary & special educational needs teachers for jobs in London, England, we also recruit experienced teaching assistants.  We are very selective, and tend to find our teaching assistants full-time jobs very quickly because of our selection process.  Our Teaching Assistants work in primary, secondary and special needs schools throughout London, England.  They often live in our accommodations and travel all around Europe in their free time with our Canadian & American teachers and TA's.

Here is the job advert:

Classroom Canada is recruiting Teaching Assistants, Educational Assistants and Learning Support Assistants to work in public schools in London, England. To be eligible, you must:
  • have experience working with primary or secondary aged children in a professional capacity (ie, in a school or non-profit organization setting)
  • have at least 2 references from professional organizations or schools
  • have an up to date police record check (dated within 3 months)
  • ideally have an undergraduate degree (BA, or BSC) or equivalent
  • be eligible for a visa to work in the UK, or have an EU passport. If you're unsure, please see http://www.classroomcanada.com/html/VisaWorkPermit.htm
Classroom Canada offers:
  • Teaching Assistant positions in a wide range of schools throughout London.
  • A bank account activated and ready for use before you leave Canada.
  • Assistance with booking tickets and advice on the perfect time to leave.
  • Assistance with accommodation with other teachers from Canada and abroad, or advice on where you can look.
  • Assessment of your occupational needs and requirements and advice on the most suitable work to fit your lifestyle.
  • Friendly, caring and individualized service.
  • Travel advice and trips organized for you with tour operators so you can easily make friends and enjoy your holiday time in Europe and Africa.
A competitive salary of 60-70 £ per day. To apply, please submit your resume & a brief cover letter outlining why you would like to be a Teaching Assistant with Classroom Canada to apply at classroomcanada dot com Visit our website: www.classroomcanada.com.

If you'd like to become part of the Classroom Canada team, please sign up for our newsletters & apply through our website. Be sure to read the Guide to Teaching in London: A Survival Guide for Canadians to help you understand everything you need to know about teaching in London.

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